Sugar under attack again

Sugar is in the news on multiple fronts. It’s clear sugar is under attack.  Products with sugar will be scrutinized. Products labels will be read. Consumers will begin questioning their sweeteners more and more.

CSPI Refiles Lawsuit Alleging Coca-Cola and ABA Deceived Consumers on Health Risks Keller and Heckman LLP

“Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a consumer-advocacy group, filed a complaint claiming that Coca-Cola and the American Beverage Association (ABA) misled consumers regarding the health risks of consuming sugary drinks such as soda.  The lawsuit specifically takes issue with Coca-Cola and the ABA’s emphasis on “calories in, calories out” and exercise as the best ways to manage health…The suit also alleges that Coca-Cola purposefully misled consumers on the health risks of drinking soda by funding research that downplays the dangers of sugary beverages. more

Should soda with non-caloric sweeteners be taxed too? In Philadelphia and Cook County, that’s the case.  Food Navigator

“Proponents of sin taxes say that putting a levy on sugar-sweetened drinks may play a pivotal role in fighting obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. But two of the eight US locations that have passed such a tax—Cook County (Chicago) and Philadelphia —passed ordinances that tax beverages with non-caloric sweeteners as well.” more

Coca-Cola’s earnings, sales top Wall Street expectations with more healthy drinks on tap CNBC

“With a new chief executive at the helm, Coca-Cola on Wednesday reported earnings and revenue that topped analysts’ expectations. The beverage maker also issued a more upbeat earnings forecast for the full year.

Increasingly, shoppers are searching for Coke’s healthier options — low in sugar and free of carbonation — which fueled these results, though Coca-Cola posted another drop in profit as it’s still in the midst of completing a refranchising plan.” more

In short check your products, ask yourself…

  • What sugars and sweeteners do I have in my products?
  • What do consumers know and think about those sweeteners. What are the trends?
  • What do my labels look like now?
  • What will my labels look like if I reformulate?
  • What will my labels look like under 1993 or 2016 labeling rule?
  • If I stick with 1993 rules, what will consumers think when I switch to 2016 labels that must list added sugars separately?
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